By Sam Sooppersaud
Like numerous sons of cricketers, young Ramano followed his father’s footsteps unto the cricket field. Like his father, the youngster was also a wicketkeeper/batsman.

Ramano Shahid will be remembered in a memorial game.

The father, Mohammed Sahid grew up at Meter-Meer-Zorg, on the West Coast of Demerara, Guyana. He developed his cricketing skills with the village club, which he represented until he left to join the Guyana Police Force in 1979.

Between the years 1979 to 1985 Mohammed played for the police force in the First Division competition in and around Georgetown. He was an excellent batsman/wicketkeeper. When not representing Police, he went back to his roots and played for his original club, Meter-Meer-Zorg.

In 1989 Mohammed Sahid along with his wife, Rufida, and their children, migrated to the United States of America. They settled in New York City where the family still lives.  Young Ramano at the time was a mere toddler, 16 months old. The parents worked hard chasing after the “American Dream” to ensure that their children get the opportunity and life, which they, the parents, did not enjoy. Eventually they were able to own and run a family business, a laundromat, which they still operate.

Once the family was relatively settled, the father, Mohammed, joined up with some friends from West Demerara and played cricket for the namesake club, West Demerara Cricket Club, in the Nassau Cricket League.

From a very tender age, Ramano would accompany his father to his games. He was eager to learn the sport. As time went by the father realized that Ramano had a knack for batting. He spotted a potential future batting star. He encouraged and practiced young Ramano’s talent. During his games the father found time to give his son ample batting practice. Ramano learnt fast. By age twelve it was evident that a future star was on the horizon. Seeing his father, whom he admired greatly, was a wicketkeeper, young Ramano took up keeping himself. He eventually played for his father’s club, West Demerara, and alternated behind the stumps with is dad.

As time went by Ramano fine tuned and developed his batting and wicket keeping skills. He was selected, and traveled to England where he took part in an Under-15 Tournament. It was successful tour for him, both with the bat and behind the stumps. Ramano was also an excellent fieldsman. Exciting New York stars Andre Kirton and Andy Mohammed were two of his teammates. In young Ramano the New York Cricket Region, and indeed the United States of America Cricket Association had high hopes of getting a future star.

After Elementary school Ramano attended John Adams High School. There he immediately involved himself in preparing a school team, which eventually took part in the PSAL cricket program which was started in 2008. He spent time to identify and train the aspiring cricketers at his school.

Unfortunately Ramano was not around to witness John Adams take part in the PSAL tournament and going on to play in the finals in 2008 and 2009. They lost in both years to Newcomers High School.  He was taken from us in an automobile accident in December 2007. Cricket had lost a budding star, and parents an adoring son! He was a very easy going and likeable young man. On the cricket field he was the consummate sportsman. He was the pride and joy of parents.

Each summer since his passing, Ramano’s friends and former teammates get together and in his honor stage the Ramano Memorial Game – to celebrate his life, and his accomplishments on the cricket field. This game will take place this Labor Day weekend, on Saturday, September 4th, at Baisely Park North (The Cage), Foch Boulevard and Long Street, Richmond Hill. N.Y. A Select Eleven of Ramano’s friends will compete against his former club, West Demerara cricket Club.

Come out and support Ramano’s family, at the same time enjoy a day of exciting cricket, good food and refreshments.

See You At The Cage!

 

4 Comments

  1. abdool shakur says:

    out of 50 kids who was in the jydp program at the cage, Romano was the only kid I see pick up the wicket keeping gloves and try his best, was always a humble kid and show me respect and respect the game as well.I will always remember Romano for his commitment towards cricket, rest in peace my brother….

  2. This came off as scheduled. It was a resounding success as 30 players most of them Ramano’s friends, and an appreciable size crowd showed up for the game. The parents and sisters of Ramano and several relatives were on hand. It was somewhat sad for the family but, like Ramano’s mom said ‘ this is a sad moment for me, but you all are like my sons and i thank you for remembering him”
    There was plenty to eat and drink. Rusty Kirton, one of Ramano’s closest buddies recalled, with a giggle, how he and Ramano played together, in England, Trinidad, the Bahamas, on tours, and how they did “boys’ things”. This was a light hearted moment.
    Teah Madho recalled the seriousness, but jovial way in which Ramano played the game. He recalled how he was batting with Ramano in the last over of a game with 8 runs needed for victory. Teach was run out and “Bigboy” came to the wicket. With one delivery to go and 2 runs to win, with Bigboy taking strike. Ramano went up to him and told him, “shut you eyes and lash” That is what Bigboy did. He connected and the ball went for 4 runs.
    He is surely missed aby all. May he rest in peace.

  3. Rusty
    I know you were very close with Ramano and it hurts that he is no longer among us. But let us concentrate on the great times we had with him. Let us think of his cricket accomplishments. Come out to the game and be a aprt of his fond memories
    Sam

  4. Rusty says:

    R.I.P to my soldier and great friend romano. i know this year i have not been part of doing something great for you but i will make up for it in the future. watch over me King